Mar 22, 2013
07:26 AM
Connecticut Today

Soap Operas—The Next Incarnation from Stamford

 
Soap Operas—The Next Incarnation from Stamford

photo by Chapman Baehler/Styling by George Kotsiopoulos

The cast of "All My Children."

     When fans of the iconic ABC daytime dramas “All My Children” and “One Life to Live” learned the network was cancelling their favorite soap operas back in 2011, they first went into a state of shock—and then launched an all-out effort via the Internet to save the 40-year-old serials.  Their efforts convinced ABC to sell the online rights to the shows in a multi-year deal to Prospect Park, a production company led by Royal Pains executive producers Rich Frank and Jeff Kwatinetz.

     But the future of the cancelled shows remained a mystery until Prospect Park’s The Online Network announced last month that it had begun production of new 30-minute episodes of “AMC” at studios in Stamford. The news lit up Internet fan sites around the globe, and also delighted Stamford officials. New episodes of “OLTL” also began filming in Stamford this week. On April 29, the revived soaps will make digital broadcast history when they will be streamed (weekdays) via Hulu and to Hulu Plus subscribers watching on TVs, cell phones and PCs. ITunes will also offer both serials.

     Connecticut’s 30-percent tax incentive for film production has turned Stamford into the media hub of the state. The city has experienced an influx of media companies and New York City-based TV shows, including “Maury” and “The Jerry Spring Show.” Major media companies doing business in Stamford include WWE, A&E Television Networks, YES Network and most recently NBC Sports. NBC set up offices at the former Clairol building for approximately 500 employees in its digital sports programming division, which includes the NBC Olympics.

     Hulu has released an official trailer highlighting the casts and crews of both "All My Children" and "One Life to Live." To view the trailers, click here on AMC  and OLTL.

Soap Operas—The Next Incarnation from Stamford

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