Oct 13, 2013
06:33 AM
Education

In Advance of Yale's Inauguration Sunday of Its New President, Campus, City Offer Warm, Wide Embrace

In Advance of Yale's Inauguration Sunday of Its New President, Campus, City Offer Warm, Wide Embrace

Mara Lavitt/New Haven Register

October 12, 2013 New HavenYale University held a campus-wide open house in celebration of Peter Salovey's inauguration on Sunday as the 23rd president of Yale. The celebration started with a Canine Kickoff, inviting all campus dogs to attend. A procession around Cross Campus included Salovey, his wife Marta Moret, and the First Dog, Portia.

NEW HAVEN--On a typical fall weekend, as Yale University was preparing to induct Peter Salovey as its 23rd president, the sprawling campus was bursting with activity, and numerous events took place across New Haven as part of the celebration.

Events included campus tours, the Institute of Sacred Music Exhibition tour, Robots Helping Kids, the Native American Cultural Center Open House and more.

The New Haven Museum opened its doors for a tour of “Wooster Square: New Haven’s First Live, Work, Build, Preserve Neighborhood.”

Wooster Square was named after Master General David Wooster, who fought in the French and Indian War. The neighborhood was established in 1824. Museum Co-curator Frank Mitchell discussed the neighborhood’s history, which included an example of what is now termed mixed-use development.

As a developing area, Wooster Square was considered a new township, creating jobs and building neighborhoods during the 19th century, according to Mitchell.

Museum visitors learned the Wooster Square neighborhood had a diversity of residents, much like today. Black, Irish and other immigrants moved to the square to make a better life for their families.

“They were really able to live together peacefully,” Mitchell said.

Another example of how Wooster Square differed back then was the Mix Museum, which at the time offered a place where people gathered to socialize and observed how other cultures lived and dressed. It was developed during the late 1800s and, unlike today’s museums, gave residents the luxury of observing such things as cultivated gardens and indulging in a hot new novelty called “ice cream.”

“People really took to this form of entertainment,” Mitchell said.

On Saturday, visitors roamed the New Haven Museum gallery learning more about how Wooster Square drew in business leaders and factory employees.

Amid all of the open house events, Salovey talked about his vision for Yale’s future and its relationship with the city in the years to come.

See the full story at New Haven Register online. And see our story on the inaguration inspiring great dining deals at New Haven's top restaurants.

In Advance of Yale's Inauguration Sunday of Its New President, Campus, City Offer Warm, Wide Embrace

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